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Issue

Robert Ryman (American, b. 1930)

1985

Medium oil on aluminum with steel supports Measurements H: 58 x W: 56 in. (147.3 x 142.2 cm) Credit Edith H. Fisher Fund Accession Number 85.15 Location Gallery 16, Scaife Galleries

Narrative

Robert Ryman’s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"—its application, lighting, and conditions of display—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.

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Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Ryman, 85.15
Robert Ryman’'s subject is painting itself, and his materials lead his endlessly varied explorations of media. Ryman is interested in "how paint works"--—its application, lighting, and conditions of display--—and the impact of his paintings on the viewer. Issue is one of several works in which the artist experimented with fasteners of all kinds--—screws, metal tabs, plastic straps, and aluminum tubing--—to support and attach a painting to the wall. Ryman’s production is intuitive, his method empirical. He began painting in 1953, working with the material problems of paint; and through that investigative process, he subtlety discovered new ways of seeing. He quickly moved to an almost exclusive use of white, because its neutrality allowed the physical characteristics of the paint to become visible. Similarly, he adopted a consistent square format for his work, precluding the need to balance compositional elements. Early in his career, Ryman painted on canvas exploiting the texture of the fabric, as well as its potential to be cut and folded. He varied his paint from glossy casein to translucent gouache to oil, which could be applied thickly. His selection of brush became the defining element, its size and interaction with the surface imparting a distinctive texture and sense of scale. By the mid 1980s, his investigations broadened to encompass a wide range of materials: glue, pastel, silverpoint, commercial paints and inks applied to waxed paper, kraft paper, newsprint, fabric, plastic, acrylic, cardboard, fiber glass, metal, and plaster.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label