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Sailing

Edward Hopper (American, 1882–1967)

1911

Medium oil on canvas Measurements H: 24 x W: 29 in. (61 x 73.7 cm) Credit Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal in honor of the Sarah Scaife Gallery Accession Number 72.43 Location Not on View

Narrative

A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]

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Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
A Closer Look Take a second look at the canvas. What do you see when you look closely at the heavily textured surface? Visible to the eye is a layer of brushstrokes that don’t conform to the image of the sailboat but instead belong to a self-portrait of the artist. When the painting is turned vertically, the original layer of brushstrokes that outline a head and shirt collar are easy to see. In preparation for a 1981 exhibition, experts at the Whitney Museum of American Art conducted an X-radiograph exam of the canvas and captured a clear image of the early self-portrait, probably from around 1904–1906. Artists of lesser means frequently reused canvases, as the ever-frugal Hopper did here. [image of X-ray]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, 1911
In this early painting of one of his favorite subjects, Hopper attempts to find a unique artistic voice. Painted in 1911, after he returned from Paris, Sailing is rendered in a manner reminiscent of the French Impressionists. Hopper applies brilliant pigments in richly textured brushstrokes to fill the canvas with a sense of clear daylight. The minimalist composition, dominated by the forms of the sails and bold areas of color, evokes a modern aesthetic, yet it is firmly planted in the realm of realist painting. Created in the studio and relying entirely on memories of his youthful experiences sailing in Nyack, New York, the work is a testament to the artist’s imagination. Exhibited in the American section of the 1913 International Exhibition of Modern Art, better known as the Armory Show, this was the first painting Hopper ever sold. Although the sale was a boost to his confidence, it did little to launch his career as a painter; he didn’t sell another painting for 10 years.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife: 72.43; Hopper, Edward; Sailing, c. 1911
Edward Hopper painted Sailing while scraping by as a magazine illustrator living in a cramped Manhattan garret. To save money, he reused an old canvas, painting over an earlier self-portrait. The painting is based on Hopper'’s memories of youthful sailing adventures on the Hudson River. It anticipates the artist’'s future greatness in the evocative contrast between the free movement of wind, waves, and boat against the static lines of shore and sky, and the magnificent depiction of sunlight falling on the smooth, curved surface of the sail. This work is important to Hopper’'s life story because it appeared in the epoch-making Armory Show of 1913, the exhibition that introduced avant-garde painting to American audiences. It was also the first painting Hopper ever sold.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 38.2; Hopper, Edward; Cape Cod Afternoon, 1936
Hopper spent nearly every summer between 1930 and 1967 in South Truro, Massachusetts, on Cape Cod. In 1936, after months of searching for the perfect subject for an oil painting, he returned to a structure he had captured in a watercolor two years before (see below). Recognizing the modernist potential of the building, Hopper’s wife, Jo, described the painting as “Disassociated from human significance its abstract pattern is very handsome—going in & out of planes, shapes, angles, and textures. The things Braque has plus.” Hopper simplified the structure to into a series of intersecting geometric planes. Long shadows cast dark pools of color along the building and ground. Since it took more than two months to complete the painting, he was dependent on his memory to render the light unaffected by seasonal change. Cape Cod Afternoon was the last canvas Hopper painted outdoors. Cape Cod Afternoon was included in the 1937 Carnegie International, Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition of contemporary art; the museum purchased it from the show. [image of House on Pamet River, ca. 1934, Whitney Museum of American Art]
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Artist Bio

Although he was always hostile to the development of abstract painting, Edward Hopper's art gives forth a distinctly modern feeling. In 1967, shortly after Hopper's death, James Thrall Soby commented that many of his (Soby's) friends among the Abstract Expressionist painters genuinely admired Hopper's work. "It always astonished me," Soby noted, "that these young artists exempted the late Edward Hopper from their acrimony against the realist tradition." In fact, the mood of loneliness and alienation in Hopper's paintings harmonizes well with the existentialist philosophies of this century, while his compositions always went beyond mere realistic transcription to establish patterns and relationships of abstract form.

Hopper achieved success in watercolor at a time when his oil paintings were still being rejected from exhibitions. He took up the medium in 1923, not having used it seriously since his student days, except in his commercial work, and made a large group of watercolors of old buildings and lighthouses in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and in Portland and Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Late in 1923 The Brooklyn Museum purchased his House with Mansard Roof, the first painting he had sold since the Armory Show. In the following year he was taken up by the New York dealer Frank Rehn, who sold every watercolor on the wall, and five more as well, from the first show he put on of Hopper's work.