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The Evening Wind

Edward Hopper (American, 1882–1967)

1921

Medium etching Measurements H: 13 1/4 x W: 15 1/2 in. (33.66 x 39.37 cm) Credit Leisser Art Fund Accession Number 49.9.6 Location Not on View

Narrative

Although he was always hostile to the development of abstract painting, Edward Hopper's art gives forth a distinctly modern feeling. In 1967, shortly after Hopper's death, James Thrall Soby commented that many of his (Soby's) friends among the Abstract Expressionist painters genuinely admired Hopper's work. "It always astonished me," Soby noted, "that these young artists exempted the late Edward Hopper from their acrimony against the realist tradition." In fact, the mood of loneliness and alienation in Hopper's paintings harmonizes well with the existentialist philosophies of this century, while his compositions always went beyond mere realistic transcription to establish patterns and relationships of abstract form. Hopper achieved success in watercolor at a time when his oil paintings were still being rejected from exhibitions. He took up the medium in 1923, not having used it seriously since his student days, except in his commercial work, and made a large group of watercolors of old buildings and lighthouses in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and in Portland and Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Late in 1923 The Brooklyn Museum purchased his House with Mansard Roof, the first painting he had sold since the Armory Show. In the following year he was taken up by the New York dealer Frank Rehn, who sold every watercolor on the wall, and five more as well, from the first show he put on of Hopper's work. Before he gained recognition as a painter, Edward Hopper worked as a commercial artist and illustrator. With the encouragement and instruction of fellow artist Martin Lewis, Hopper took up etching to support himself. He made about 100 prints, most of them between 1915 and 1923. Hopper later commented that he felt etching helped him become a better painter; "After I took up etching, my painting seemed to crystallize," he said. Despite his brief career as a printmaker, Hopper is among the most compelling American etchers of the 1920s. His prints seem technically simple. Most are straightforward, with little tone or drama; but their very lack of drama gives them a distinctive character.

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Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 16.32.4; Sloan, John; Turning out the Light, 1905, 49.9.6; Hopper, Edward; The Evening Wind, 1921
One of Hopper’s signature subjects is a lone woman in an interior before a window, a theme that he began to explore around 1909. In this bold etching, the interplay of light and shadow elevates the drama of the composition. Disrupting the tranquility of the moment, an evening breeze lifts the curtain, causing the woman to turn toward its source. The heavy concentration of cross-hatching on the far wall provides a striking contrast to the absence of line in the open window, which allows the white of the paper to shine through. Hopper was a great admirer of John Sloan, a member of The Eight, a group of American artists who championed subjects from everyday life in the city. The Evening Wind is clearly indebted to Sloan’s controversial print Turning out the Light. In Sloan’s image, the bright light draws attention to the centrally placed woman, making it easy to overlook her lover in shadow.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Adventures in Etching
Adventures in Etching In 1915, with no formal training, Hopper began to experiment with etching. Receiving technical advice and encouragement from Martin Lewis, an Australian printmaker and illustrator famous for his dramatic and richly dark impressions of city life, Hopper embraced the medium with great enthusiasm. The etchings became Hopper's most personal and intimate artistic outlet, during a time when he felt unfulfilled as a commercial illus­trator, producing work for others. The etchings reveal Hopper's struggle to embrace uniquely American content, motivated by the ideas of Robert Henri, his former teacher at the New York School of Art. Hopper studied prints by established printmakers and old masters, Rembrandt and Charles Meryon in particular, for technical guidance and inspiration. Preparatory drawings survive for many of the prints, revealing that his meticulous preparation and highly calculated compositions began early in his career. Hopper first exhibited his etchings in 1917, and within a few years he was at the forefront of American printmaking. But he largely abandoned the medium in 1923 as his reputation as a painter gained traction. Carnegie Museum of Art purchased 11 etchings from Hopper's dealer, Frank K. M. Rehn, in 1949. Three are on view in this exhibition for the first time, including his most famous print, Night Shadows.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Artist Bio

Although he was always hostile to the development of abstract painting, Edward Hopper's art gives forth a distinctly modern feeling. In 1967, shortly after Hopper's death, James Thrall Soby commented that many of his (Soby's) friends among the Abstract Expressionist painters genuinely admired Hopper's work. "It always astonished me," Soby noted, "that these young artists exempted the late Edward Hopper from their acrimony against the realist tradition." In fact, the mood of loneliness and alienation in Hopper's paintings harmonizes well with the existentialist philosophies of this century, while his compositions always went beyond mere realistic transcription to establish patterns and relationships of abstract form.

Hopper achieved success in watercolor at a time when his oil paintings were still being rejected from exhibitions. He took up the medium in 1923, not having used it seriously since his student days, except in his commercial work, and made a large group of watercolors of old buildings and lighthouses in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and in Portland and Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Late in 1923 The Brooklyn Museum purchased his House with Mansard Roof, the first painting he had sold since the Armory Show. In the following year he was taken up by the New York dealer Frank Rehn, who sold every watercolor on the wall, and five more as well, from the first show he put on of Hopper's work.