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Untitled (Yellow Bath)

Rachel Whiteread (British, b. 1963)

1996

Medium rubber and polystyrene Measurements H: 31 1/2 x W: 81 1/2 x D: 45 1/3 in. (80.01 x 207.01 x 115.15 cm) Credit The Henry L. Hillman Fund Accession Number 1996.38.A-.D Location Not on View

Narrative

For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.

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Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife, Whiteread, 1996.38
For Untitled (Yellow Bath), Rachel Whiteread built a frame around an inverted bathtub to cast the space surrounding the tub rather than its interior space. Her product gives a solid form to what was negative space—the space the tub displaced in its environment—separating the tub from its original function and placement. This dissociation causes a visual disorientation, compelling the viewer to sculpt a mental image of an object defined only by its abstracted impression. Whiteread underscores the ritualistic implications of the tub’s form—alluding to baptism, purification, and objects associated with entombment, such as sarcophagi or coffins. The surfaces of the tub not only carry specific traces of meaning and memory, but they also trigger the personal associations of the viewer. Whiteread is one of many international artists re-interpreting the legacy of Minimalism, a simplified abstract style of the 1960s and 1970s, but the subjective aspect of her work separates her from the style’s origins. While Whiteread’'s predecessors sought to explore pure form outside of any specific thematic references, she has consistently investigated the pure sculptural qualities of domestic objects, such as wardrobes, bathtubs, and chairs, and the spaces they inhabit.
Date: 2005
Purpose: label

Artist Bio

Rachel Whiteread was born in London, England, in 1963, where she currently lives and works. She received her MA from the Slade School of Fine Art in 1987 and won the prestigious Turner Prize in 1993. Her Untitled (One Hundred Spaces) (1995) was featured in the Scaife Gallery in the 1995 Carnegie International and her work represented Britain in the 1997 Venice Biennial. She has been featured in numerous solo exhibitions including at the Tate Modern, London (2005-2006); Gagosian Gallery, London (2005); Luhring Augustine, New York (2003); Haunch of Venison, London, and Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (both in 2004), and the Serpentine Gallery, London (2001). She has also been included in a number of group shows (in addition to those mentioned above) at venues including the Wexner Center for the Arts (2006); The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (both in 2004); SITE Santa Fe and Tate Britain (both in 2003); the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (2002), and The Museum of Modern Art, New York (2001-2002).

[extracted from acquisition proposal, 2006]